October 19, 2006

How Qaeda warned its operatives on using cell phones

Folks, psssst, got something to leak to ya. When an aspiring Al Qaeda terrorist is buying a cell phone, "it's best that he purchase the chip inside the device under a phony name or from a black market vendor that does not sell the accompanying documentation. If he has any reason to believe his phone has been tapped, he should sell it immediately to a stranger."

This is the kind of advice contained in "Myth of Delusion," a 151-page manuscript making the rounds on password-protected jihadi Web sites. The book recently caught the attention of American intelligence analysts, who estimate that it was released sometime this summer. The author of the book is a little-known terrorist puke named Mohammed al-Hakaymah, a member of a violent Muslim group that recently splintered off from an Egyptian Islamist organization, Gama'a al-Islamiyya, when it signed a cease-fire agreement with Cairo. Hakaymah gained some notoriety on August 5, 2006 when Osama bin Laden's Egyptian-born deputy, Ayman al-Zawahiri, mentioned his name in an announcement that Al Qaeda was merging with the splinter group.

Folks, this Muslim terrorist handbook is being considered the most comprehensive manuscript of its type seen so far by intelligence officials. But no one is telling you about it except for two conservative news sources - this article was published in a conservative newspaper, The New York Sun, and was also reported on Fox News.

See, while Hakaymah makes no mention of the December 2005 New YorkTimes article that first disclosed that the National Security Agency was tapping phone numbers found in cell phones captured from suspected Al Qaeda operatives in Afghanistan, Hakaymah does devote a chapter to electronic surveillance. Coincidence? I don't think so, and neither do intelligence officials.

So, G-d Forbid, if one of your loved ones gets blown up, or beheaded, or nuked, please send a thank you note to those dirty rat bastards at New York Times. It will be because of them that you would be in mourning.