March 13, 2007

2nd-Temple Jewish Town Uncovered in Jerusalem

The archaeological discoveries in Israel, the age of the Hebrew language and the artifacts found in Israel are irrefutable proof that Jews in Israel predate Mohammedans by thousands of years, no matter what Greta Berlin or Ibrahim Hooper say. Muslims and their supporters are so afraid that something might emerge to cast doubt on the veracity of Islam, or that its tenuous credibility might collapse with the discovery of genuine Jewish historical artifacts and will therefore contradict the lies entrenched in Islam's supposed "scholars", that they literally curdle when remains of ancient Jewish communities are uncovered. Muslims are frightened iconoclasts who secretly pray that their leaders erase the past to legitimize their despicable present. That is why I celebrate yet another crowning Jewish archaeological discovery in Israel. Mohammad Yousef, who can receive your hate mail at MohammadYousef@yahoo.com, hopefully will get a stroke reading this exciting article. If not a stroke, then may he lose all his teeth, may a pox fall upon his house and home, and may his fingers wither and his intestines blacken. From IsraelNN.com:

In the course of preparing tracks for the new light-rail system in Jerusalem, remains of an ancient Jewish community just north of the Holy Temple have been uncovered. Rescue digs, required by law before any major construction work in Jerusalem and environs, have found a major set of remains of a Jewish town from post-Second Temple times. A long strip of land, 400 dunams (100 acres) in size, has been uncovered in which can be seen roads, alleys, houses, public buildings, a mikveh (ritual bath), and more. The community was located east of the old
Roman highway leading from Jerusalem to Shechem (Nablus) - roughly along the same route as today's Shechem Way, or Highway 60.

Evidence shows that the community - the largest from that period yet uncovered in the Jerusalem vicinity - was inhabited by a well-to-do and religiously observant populace. In addition to the mikveh, many stone utensils were found - popularly used because they could not become ritually defiled, according to Jewish Law. Many coins were also found, including a rare gold one (pictured above) depicting Trainus Caesar (98-117 CE). Trainus began his reign 30 years after the Second Temple was destroyed. Antiquities Authority dig manager Rachel Bar-Natan said that this was only the second coin of its type found in Israel, and the first one within the Green Line.